Captain Marvel Review [No Spoilers!]


You might not have heard of her, but soon enough you will. You may not care much about her, but soon you might. She’s the latest addition to the Marvel Comic Universe roster, Captain Marvel! Whilst I will admit that even as a self-proclaimed comic-book enthusiast, (basically being filled with what many people would call “useless trivia”), I don’t know that much about Captain Marvel. I didn’t really know her origins, the extent of her powers, her relation to the Avengers, anything at all really! All I knew was that she was pretty much a badass with enough powers to make short work of most of the heroes in the MCU.


This will be a spoiler-free review, so there’s only really a certain amount I can say. First of all – if you are on the fence about it, or maybe a little skeptical – go and watch it. I’ve noticed a lot of negative energy surrounding the film; although a good portion of this was before its release, which was to be taken with a pinch of salt.) But I believe, like many others I know, that you can only judge something once you’ve seen it. Besides, why would you not want to see it? It’s the last MCU movie before Avengers: Endgame. It should be on your MCU checklist of Marvel-related things to do before you gear up for what is guaranteed to be an unbelievable cinematic experience.

I’ll admit I was a little skeptical about seeing Captain Marvel initially. Not because I was riding the wave of negativity mustered by some of those on Twitter, but just because I was almost clueless on everything to do with her. But I’m so glad I decided to go for it. I was always going to. It was on my checklist.)

I felt Brie Larson’s incarnation of Captain Marvel set the bar for anyone else who may try and take up the mantle. (in the probably very far future.) I felt as though she was very likeable and had that Marvel-whit about her. Although, her performance is elevated with the addition of many other characters, namely Samuel Jackson as a young 90’s-esque Nick Fury. I can’t really say too much about the other characters, as it may spoil the movie somewhat, but the other characters really help give the movie some heart and help in setting her on the path to become Captain Marvel.


I know that sometimes when a new MCU movie comes out, some people will ask the question “Was it like Avengers? Guardians of the Galaxy?” or various other comparisons to other MCU films. In truth, I don’t really think it does compare to any. Okay, that’s a little bit of a fib. At first it screams that style that is “Cosmic Marvel” but that doesn’t last too long, and it really comes into its own. I don’t wish to compare to any other film, and some might feel like comparing it, but I feel that such a good job was done to make it unique, that it shouldn’t.

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Make sure you stay after the credits!

I walked out sort of shocked. I didn’t think I’d grow to like a character I barely knew anything about so quickly. I just had the same thought going through my head – “What a badass!”. I just can’t help but think that she’s going to fit right in with Avengers: Endgame. I know some who are skeptical for various reasons, but sadly I cannot really indulge talking about them. You’ll have to formulate your own opinion on that front.

I felt a lot of emotions throughout the movie. Several times I almost felt like welling up a little, and it did pull at my heartstrings a little bit. And of course, it wouldn’t be an MCU movie without some quippy one-liners and some bizarre comedic moments. It might not invoke some of those emotions for everyone, but it’s one hell of a ride either way. I believe that is it definitely not a bad movie like some people have been attempting to make it out to be. But hey, I’m not here to tell you whether you’ll like it or not, I personally just liked it a lot. You may hate it, hopefully not, or you may love it (Maybe even more than Winter Soldier! Gasp!) but it’s worth watching it and seeing for yourself. There’s a lot of mixed reviews out there, and it’s appearing to be in some cases look like a bit of a marmite scenario. (That’s a “Love it or hate it” scenario for anyone who’s not with me!)


Well, I’ve pretty much exhausted all I can say without spoiling anything. In a way I’ve not really said all that much. My argument is – if you’re undecided, just go and see it yourself. I will admit I want people to like it, maybe not as much as some of the popular MCU choice favourites like Black Panther, Winter Soldier, Civil War or Infinity War, but I know for some it will be up there with their choices at least. Enough waffling! If you’re after something a little different, you can’t go far wrong than watching Captain Marvel.


 

Dungeons and Dragons: Suddenly Mainstream?


Anyone else feel like Dungeons and Dragons keeps popping up everywhere? At first, I thought it was a coincidence. Whenever you get into something, whether it’s a TV show, book series or a new hobby, you always feel like you notice it more, mainly because you pay attention to it more. (And maybe internet cookies. They definitely have a role to play.) But generally, it’s because you just end up noticing it more. But now I’m starting to feel like maybe it’s a little more than that.


I got into playing Dungeons and Dragons in the later part of 2018. A few close friends of mine had shown great interest in trying to start a campaign, and were eager to recruit me to their ranks, and they knew I would be totally hooked, because they know me far too well. It didn’t take long for them to convince me to start thinking of a character to create, whilst our soon-to-be Dungeon-Master began crafting a world for us to venture, filling it with various characters, locations, as well as giving it a lore and history. And voicing goblins to a point where beer would almost shoot out my nose.

Creating my character wasn’t that hard. I cheated a little bit, and I used a character template that I had created years ago from my World of Warcraft Roleplaying days. Although there were some slight differences to make her fit into the Dungeons and Dragons setting, but overall the character was practically no different. The created character Shaavra Ragescar, a female half-orc fighter, formerly a Kingsguard of the soon-to-be King in the soon-to-be created world. Our Dungeon-Master was nice and asked us to give him our character backstories, and he would see where they could fit into the world he made.

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I recommend trying to get your hands on a copy of the 7th Edition of the player rules if you’re serious. Even just one person having it in your group is enough!

After getting past some of the initially confusing character creation details, involving choosing stats and such, it wasn’t long before we all got stuck in, rolling dice like our fictional character lives really did depend on it (which they did), and occasionally trying out awkward voice acting, and trying to get more comfortable in roleplaying. It isn’t easy unless you’re used to it, and it takes a lot of practice. But we’re not all sat around a table in full-on cosplay of our characters, taking everything super-duper seriously. No. More often than not, I’ve usually got a mild buzz on after two pints due to me being a lightweight, and there’s some snacks going around, baked goods as our host loves to bake something new for us every week, and there’s plenty, and I mean plenty, of laughs.


I’m getting off track. This isn’t about my first time playing and getting to grips with Dungeons and Dragons, that can be another post for another day. This is about noticing how popular it seems to be. I mean, to some degree it’s always been popular. It’s always had a fierce and loyal following. And it isn’t a single aspect or reason as to why it suddenly seems a bit more popular in the mainstream now. My friends and I were talking about the popular Youtube series, “Critical Role” which they had gotten me hooked on, despite being four hours long at a time. They thought that maybe this was a reason as to why it’s grown in popularity. These are voice actors famous in their fields for video games such as Overwatch and the likes, that get together once a week and play Dungeons and Dragons for everyone to watch and enjoy, as they get fully immersed into their characters, and obviously give amazing voices to them, and adventure in a world that’s oh-so-carefully crafted and thought about.

There’s zero doubt that these loveable nerds have helped to grow the fanbase of Dungeons and Dragons. But I don’t know if they’re the sole reason. In my personal opinion, I feel as though the level of escapism that D&D brings is tantalizing. Maybe it’s to do with the rise of social media in the last decade, and how gathering around a table with your friends for hours and playing pretend in a world with uncanny consequences is just too tempting. Maybe it’s because, generally speaking, it’s very cheap to enjoy playing D&D, and as long as someone has access to some of the books needed and can afford some dice for the many rolls required, it’s not hard to assemble a team and get started. Maybe it’s because it offers an experience that no video game can truly offer. Maybe it’s because Matt Mercer is that good. (It probably is, He’s such a gifted Dungeon-Master!)


Like most things, I think it’s a culmination of all of the above and more. There’s no single source for what seems to be a rise in Dungeons and Dragons. Although, I feel as thought Critical Role has certainly helped to open to the idea to people who may no have even heard of it before, but they’re now completely hooked and like dressing up as High Elves for every game session. If you’ve ever been curious, or perhaps know someone who plays, or even if you’re just after something new to watch on Youtube, no harm in checking it out. Dice are cheaper than Diamonds.